Time Flies When You're Saving Lives!

I knew it was about time to do a blog but just realized it’s been over a month since the last post!  

I will try to catch you up on what’s been going on here.  Sometimes it all runs together and it’s hard to remember what happens from day to day.  (But I'll take it! I'm praying everyday becomes "just another day" of saving kids’ lives, and making them happy and health — maybe for the first time in their lives!) 

 This little one looks a little worried... maybe he knew we were his last hope to survive.

This little one looks a little worried... maybe he knew we were his last hope to survive.

Over the last several weeks we have had several kids come to the medical or malnutrition clinics that weighed less than five pounds!  Most of their mothers had died during child birth (or shortly thereafter) from complications.  I saw a statistic recently that only one out of every 1,000 births in Haiti has an attendant present who has any kind of medical training. 1 in 1,000.

 This little one is cared for by an overwhelmed grandma who's daughter died during delivery 

This little one is cared for by an overwhelmed grandma who's daughter died during delivery 

People do the best they can, which often isn’t enough.  Things are difficult and there is no government assistance for anyone.  Simple education is so important to give these little ones a chance in the face of so many adversities.

This little one lost his mom after delivery and was being cared for by an aunt.  The aunt had been feeding the baby a diet solely consisting of sweet tea. It was amazing the baby was still alive.

 "My first taste of real food!"

"My first taste of real food!"

Our formula program has exploded in the last several weeks. 

So many little babies who were simply starving to death now have a chance to live — just by providing them formula. 

We do our very best to keep babies nursing but our formula program gave out 36 cans of formula last week. This is becoming a big expense alone plus the other costs of the malnutrition clinic for the kids on the medical peanut butter. (Please pray and give so my formula ministry can continue.)

Last week I was called down stairs for a patient one evening. 

I found two pregnant ladies waiting for me. Mamma #1 is Clernelie (pictured below, left) and Mamma #2 is Nerlaude (right). Clernelie (#1) was having some issues with her pregnancy and wanted to be evaluated. 

Nerlaude (#2) was just along for moral support — and a free checkup if possible. #1 is 8 months and was doing OK, but is anemic. I gave her some prenatal vitamins and did some education with her.

 

Do twins run in the family?

#2 is 5 months and after evaluating her I asked if twins ran in the family or if she was starting something new?! #1 immediately busted up laughing while #2 just sat there staring at me. The picture below picture was taken about 15 minutes after #2 found out she was having twins! You can see #1 still thinks it was funny and #2 still looks like she is in shock.

Clernelie wouldn't let up with the jokes and Nerlaude kept saying "I'm not ready for two more!" 

Please remember both of these ladies and their babies in prayer for health and safety and normal full-term deliveries.

 Clerenelie and Nerlaude in my clinic after some exciting news!

Clerenelie and Nerlaude in my clinic after some exciting news!

I am seriously considering a Maternity clinic to go along with the Medical, Malnutrition, and wound care clinics I already do. 

There is such a difference that some simple education and care can make for these Mamma’s and their babies.  As you have seen in many past posts, some simple things have saved many lives!

 Naisha with her Mamma Rachel

Naisha with her Mamma Rachel

Their lives were saved by a simple blood pressure check back in May.  She was 4 pounds 8 oz. when she was delivered by emergency C-section (because her Mom had preeclampsia and was at risk of dying. She had no idea she was sick and they both would have been dead in about 24 hours.  They stopped by the clinic this week for a checkup.  It was so good to see them, it makes my heart happy to be a part of there lives!

 

I hit a big mile stone this last week!  

We started the malnutrition clinic on January 31. And on October 10 we hit 1,000 total visitors!

Many children have come through our doors and, through your partnership, I've have been able to save lives and make some healthy kids who, now, won’t have learning disabilities and medical problems because of severe malnutrition. THANK YOU!

 Regina couldn't figure out what all the excitement was about. She is number 1,000!

Regina couldn't figure out what all the excitement was about. She is number 1,000!

Do you remember Rosedena?  She was the one that her mother was only feeding her cookies and dirty water back in January.  At first glance she looked fine until you looked closer and saw it wasn’t baby fat but was actually edema from Kwashiorkor (swelling caused from late stage protein deficiency). She almost died. 

Now ... she's about to graduate out of the malnutrition program!

 Rosedena looking happy and very healthy!

Rosedena looking happy and very healthy!

 One of two graduates from the malnutrition clinic last week!

One of two graduates from the malnutrition clinic last week!

Karen Bultje from Coram Deo (the place where we hold the clinics up the road) does so much for the people of Haiti. She allows many people from the countryside to live at her compound while they are getting medical care in Port-au-Prince. 

This little guy has been waiting some time for surgery to have a shunt placed to relieve his Hydrocephalus. When they call he has to be healthy to have surgery. 

He has recurring respiratory infections as it’s very difficult to set him up properly while feeding him because of the weight of his head. So, he often chokes and gets food into his lungs. 

I'm doing all I can for him! And praying he will be healthy when they call.

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Most kids have very little in Haiti as far as toys.  When you only have enough to eat once a day, you don’t spend money on toys. But, kids can be very creative and can make their own toys!  I saw a little guy (below) on the street the other day pulling his truck down the road.  

One man's junk is another kid's toy!

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I was hanging-out at the Rev Home with my little friend, Christina, the other night. And it wasn't until after she left, when I was going through my photographs, that I noticed her Spider-Man crocs! Too cute! 

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Do you remember little Davernile?  Her 19-year-old mother tried her best to let her die before finally abandoning her with an Aunt.  She was 18-months-old and wasn’t quite 9 pounds when she was brought to us in May.  She was almost dead the second time her mom brought her back to the clinic.

 Left: Back in May when she was so sick. Right: After a couple months of inpatient care 

Left: Back in May when she was so sick. Right: After a couple months of inpatient care 

I am happy to report that she is going well and is about to be moved to a special needs home. 

After much work, they were unable to get her family to agree to care for her.  With her disabilities she will need a lot of extra attention and medical care that the family is not willing to take on.

On October 28 I will be heading about 4 hours north of Port-au-Prince to the northern plateau of Haiti.  A ministry I have gotten to know needs a medical member to go with there team.  I will be going to 5 feeding centers and looking over the kids and taking care of there medical needs.  I will be seeing about 50 kids each day.  I am excited to get out of Port-au-Prince for a while and see some of the country side.  Please remember me in prayer from the 28th to November 4th, as I am traveling and working in a new area.  

I will update you on my adventures when I get home.  

I know that many of you have said that you enjoy reading my blog posts. I do hope that they are more than just of interest to you. 

 

As I continue to see more patients, my costs are steadily going up. 

I am quickly approaching the point where a single day at the malnutrition clinic will cost $500. with Formula, Medika Mumba (medical peanut butter given to kids 6 months to 6 years for malnutrition), medications, supplies, and clinic costs. 

I run 4 or 5 malnutrition clinics a month $2,000 or more a month (depending how many Tuesdays there are that month). $2,000 is more than my total monthly income right now. I hope that you would seriously consider being part of this life saving and life changing work, by increasing your pledge to the ministry, sharing the news of my ministry with others, and asking your friends and family to consider supporting my work in Haiti. 

Maybe you even know of someone who could be our first business or corporate supporter!

It is such a blessing to serve the children of Haiti on your behalf.  Together we are making a real, tangible, practical, difference! 

Until No Child Dies

Kelby