What Happened To Snow Days?

When I was a kid, school got cancelled for only one reason — snow. In Haiti, though, school kids have a break for things like "manifestation" day (because there are riots and demonstrations) and hurricane days. 

People are protesting a new tax law with a lot of unfair and excessive taxes in it. They said the goal was to bring the country to a standstill today. There was a leaflet circulating that basically says, "if you are going to go out on Monday be considerate of your family and put a toe tag on before leaving the house because you probably won’t survive the trip."

They will also have a transportation strike (which almost always closes school) on Wednesday, Thursday, and Friday — when no public transportation (Tap Tap's & Motto's) running.  We also have Hurricane Maria coming on, hopefully, the same path as Irma, or further north.  So, it could be a very short week of school.

We closed clinic today in light of the situation. 

It’s hard knowing people need help but from a long term view it’s the right thing to do. 

I'm thankful Tuesday is the only normal day of the week. So we'll have our regular malnutrition clinic and get some food to babies in the program. I am sure it will be a extremely long day — in addition to malnutrition clinic, we've moved Monday's wound to Tuesday, too. 

There has been so much going on since I returned it’s hard to keep track of it all. 

We have had some new babies born since the last post!

 This is Tanicha.

This is Tanicha.

Tanicha was born the day before Irma hit to a Mamma I have been working with.  She is healthy and doing fine.  Such a blessing to be able to be a part of this life, since before she was even born!

 This is Ester, the newest, smallest, and most recent Life saved through Kelby’s Kids!!

This is Ester, the newest, smallest, and most recent Life saved through Kelby’s Kids!!

Ester is the daughter of one of the school staff.  She came to me on Monday morning (September 11) and said she wasn’t feeling well.  She was in preeclampsia and I sent her to the hospital. She was born by emergency C-section. She was about 4 weeks early and only weighted 5 pounds. She is doing well but is having a little trouble nursing. 

I'm working hard to keep another child off of formula in Haiti.  I'm thankful for more lives saved through you and the ministry of Kelby’s Kids.

I have had several people come to the gate in the evening since returning.  The ER is so out of reach for many people in the ravine, so they rely on Kelby’s Kids for their care.

 She loves all the color options for her bandages!

She loves all the color options for her bandages!

Sue Ellen stepped on a broken bottle just before Irma and had a pretty bad laceration to the bottom of her foot.  There is no way it wouldn’t have gotten very infected without proper care.  She comes in every other day for a bandage change.  When I unwrap the old one the dust and dirt just flies off! 

So, it has to be well-protected from the dirt and germs of the street.  She gives me a kiss on the cheek every time I finish and she says "merci!"

 Boys will be boys!

Boys will be boys!

This little man came home from playing and was bleeding. He has no idea what happened.  So obviously he was doing something he shouldn’t have been. 

Suturing was a failed option as he just would not hold still despite the Lidocaine.  When he knew I was touching him he would not hold still.  So, we had to go to plan B and glued it with Derma Bond. It looks pretty good and I hope it’s doing well.  (Unfortunately, he didn’t return for a re-check on Saturday!)

We have a guy in our wound care program right now that stepped on a sea urchin about a month ago.  I don’t want to lose readers so I will not post a picture of his foot, so I'll just say "there was some tissue damage."  I think we are making progress and he is going to keep his foot though!

We have had some great success stories lately!!

 Samuel when he came to the clinic

Samuel when he came to the clinic

When Samuel came to the clinic he was very sick and could barely eat.  He had to be fed with a syringe. He was too sick for outpatient care and was subsequently sent to an inpatient clinic.

 Samuel now

Samuel now

Samuel's Mamma came to clinic last week to show off her “new” little boy after being discharged recently.  He is twice the child he used to be and she was so happy and proud!

 Malnutrition is devastation to mind and body. Her orange hair is due to chronic malnutrition

Malnutrition is devastation to mind and body. Her orange hair is due to chronic malnutrition

Last week we had a graduation!

 Wilgina when admitted to the malnutrition program

Wilgina when admitted to the malnutrition program

When Wilgina came to the clinic she was very under weight. Only 9 short weeks later she has graduated the program.  She gained a little over 7 pounds in 9 weeks.  That’s a 59% increase in body weight!  Medika Mumba is an amazing product.

 Wilgina at graduation with Meredith and I

Wilgina at graduation with Meredith and I

It takes $1,000.00 a month just to provide the formula and Medika Mumba (medical peanut butter) we use for the malnutrition program.  This does not include the medications and other expenses that go along with this clinic — in addition to the medical clinic, school clinic, and wound care program. 
If you’re not already involved I hope you would consider joining in the work that Kelby’s Kids is doing in Haiti.  And if you are already involved, on behalf of the Mamma’s and the children, "Merci Anpil (Thank-You very much)!"

Until No Child Dies,

Kelby

 

p.s.

I would like to wish my neighbors, friends, and partners in ministry to Haiti — Troy and Gwyn Price — a happy 29th anniversary!!  It’s truly a blessing to serve with you and your family!

 Troy, Gwen, Meredith, & Makayla Price

Troy, Gwen, Meredith, & Makayla Price